Driving Tip #33

This is true on so many levels. Not only can you learn a lot about the ‘lane changer’, you can also learn about multiple others (even those farther ahead) by how they respond to the ‘lane changer’. 

Do they unnecessarily slow? Or, if slowing is necessary, do they do it wisely? Are they caught off guard? Do they take advantage of the newly opened space? Are they looking ahead and paying attention? Do they use their lane to help provide more room to maneuver and to allow others to better see, accelerate or change lanes? (Most of these are ‘reading traffic’ techniques that we’ve already covered.)

Indeed, a single lane change is an opportunity to learn about multiple drivers in just a few seconds. Information that you can use to better predict their actions and time yours.

You truly can learn a lot about multiple drivers simply by observing how they respond to someone else’s lane change. This is valuable information that helps prevent traffic congestion, accidents and fatalities.
You truly can learn a lot about multiple drivers simply by observing how they respond to someone else’s lane change. This is valuable information that helps prevent traffic congestion, accidents and fatalities.

Driving Tip #32

Combining ‘gap technology’ and ‘lane changing’, reveals a lot about an individual. It reveals their awareness (reading traffic), timing and handling skills. …Did they use their gap when preparing for the lane change? Did they accelerate to fill a large gap thus creating minimal or no deceleration or did they unnecessarily decelerate and/or cause others to decelerate? 

And if slowing was necessary, did they use their gap wisely in order to minimize its affect on others? …How do they continue to use their new gap after the lane change?

Observing and learning about how a person uses their gap BEFORE and AFTER a lane change, is valuable driving tip to help increase efficiency, reduce traffic congestion and prevent accidents.
Observing and learning about how a person uses their gap BEFORE and AFTER a lane change, is a valuable driving tip to help increase efficiency, reduce traffic congestion and prevent accidents.

Driving Tip #31

Was it smooth and efficient or was it rough and awkward? Did they use their mirrors or did they only twist their body to look over their shoulder? Did they observe continually or was it a last second thought? Did they accelerate into an open gap without slowing anybody down or did they unnecessarily step on their brakes and cause people to slow?

All of this provides valuable information that you can use to learn about them, which you can then use in the moment and on down the road.

Observing ‘how’ a person/everyone changes lanes is information that you can use to achieve smoother flowing traffic, increase efficiency and prevent accidents.
Observing ‘how’ a person/everyone changes lanes is information that you can use to achieve smoother flowing traffic, increase efficiency and prevent accidents.

Driving Tip #30

Not just right in front of you and into your lane, but all around you and into and out of multiple lanes. You can use the observations to learn about that person and others, as well as, to be proactive about.

We’ll cover several ‘reading traffic’ tips dealing with observing lane changes, which you can use to reduce slowing and over-accelerations, and even help others prevent accidents.

Simply observing more lane changes can prevent traffic congestion, accidents and fatalities.
Simply observing more lane changes can prevent traffic congestion, accidents and fatalities.

Driving Tip #29

This one observation can give you a tremendous amount of information about someone. Information that can come in handy, on down the road. You can use it to better predict their future actions, which in turn can be used to better time you accelerations and decelerations.

Side note: Providing room/‘making a move’ for others isn’t only for their benefit, it’s also a valuable communication technique for anyone anyone who observes it. Indeed, many thousands of accidents could have been avoided if someone would have made a seemingly unnecessary move JUST to raise awareness!

Observing how others ‘make room’ for pedestrians, bicyclists and turning traffic is valuable information and can help prevent accidents, traffic congestion and fatalities.
Observing how others ‘make room’ for pedestrians, bicyclists and turning traffic is valuable information and can help prevent accidents, traffic congestion and fatalities.

Driving Tip #28

Do they simply follow in a straight line, in the middle of the lane, keeping the same gap length? Or maybe they are always on the outside of a lane, away from oncoming traffic, never trying to look past the vehicle ahead? Or maybe they move freely in their lane, consciously trying to see traffic farther ahead?

The first two usually indicate less awareness and skill, while the last one indicates more. With just a couple of seconds of study, it’s usually possible to determine what type of driver they are. Combine this with continued observation and you can most often predict their actions, which allows you to better time yours.

Noticing ‘where’ a person positions themselves in a lane (plus how they use it) can help you increase efficiency and prevent accidents.
Noticing ‘where’ a person positions themselves in a lane (plus how they use it) can help you increase efficiency and prevent accidents.

Driving Tip #27

This is how to minimizing unnecessary accelerations and decelerations in order to increase efficiency and achieve maximum flow. It takes constant awareness, continually learning about others and working on one’s own timing. But when you do achieve it, very little fuel will be wasted.

Read through the tip again. It’s not just about ‘reading’ others’ timing of accelerations and decelerations, BUT rather those things in respect to others’ accelerations and decelerations. It’s taking it to an even deeper level.

Mastering observing others’ reactions to others reactions is a very advanced fuel efficiency technique that reduces traffic congestion and prevents accidents.
Mastering observing others’ reactions to others’ reactions is a very advanced fuel efficiency technique that reduces traffic congestion and prevents accidents.

Driving Tip #26

This ‘reading traffic’ driving tip is about how ‘situations and environments are always changing so what might be perfectly fine one moment may not be wise the next’. And in order to stay efficient and safe requires continually taking in information in order to make honest analyses and judgements.

Staying safe, being efficient and preventing accidents and congestion isn’t about doing the same thing.
Staying safe, being efficient and preventing accidents and congestion isn’t about always doing the same thing.

Driving Tip #25

This isn’t always true, of course. But for the most part, if handling and ‘reading traffic’ skills hadn’t been increased to the level they were, more than likely they wouldn’t be following at the distance they are. This is true for whatever size of gap a person has.

This does NOT mean that the closer you follow the better! There is an ideal following distance that varies depending on the equipment, the individual, the road conditions, the road design, the traffic flow, etc… and skill level.

But, none the less, virtually every gap can tell you a lot about that individual and more times than not those with shorter gaps are more skilled and aware.

Important Note: Again, to reiterate, ‘looking ahead and reading others properly’ is paramount in order to successfully utilize shorter gaps and still be efficient and safe. Those who don’t read traffic properly, will spend much of their time and energy decelerating and re-accelerating over and over again. And it’s easy to see who they are by observing their timing, ‘reading traffic’ and handling skills in their actions and reactions. (You noticing and learning about these individuals is more of you ‘reading traffic properly’.)

2nd Important Note: There are also people with short gaps who are too close and constantly cross the lines into others’ personal space*. When you see it, read it and learn about that person. And if this describes you (as it has us all on occasion), know that there is a difference in ‘communicating with others’ (we’ll cover communication later) and ‘irritating them’. If you ‘communicate’ without irritating them, they are much more likely to work with you, rather than against you.

*Personal space depends on the individual. What is acceptable to one person may not be acceptable to another. Knowing this is important. Personal space can be partially determined by observing (reading) a person’s skills and confidence. For example, the gap a person has in front of them can tell you about what their ‘comfort zone’ and ‘personal space’ boundaries are.

A shorter gap often shows skills and awareness. The question to ask is, ‘how is someone using their gap?’
A shorter gap often shows skills and awareness. The question to ask is, ‘how is someone using their gap?’

Driving Tip #24

What most people who have a large gap don’t realize is the affect that they have on the traffic behind them.  Many times, they could use some of their gap to help prevent traffic congestion instead of compounding it. And even more so, when someone changes lanes in front of them and they slow down to get that same gap back, they often cause an even bigger chain reaction.

There are several things that could be done to prevent the ‘need’ for the excessive gap. Mainly, increasing ‘reading traffic’, timing, handling and reaction skills, which is why all of these first 100 tips have to with ‘reading traffic’.

Important Note: I must keep reiterating that ‘looking ahead and reading the situation and others (and their gap and surroundings) properly’ is paramount in order to successfully tell if a gap is unnecessarily large. (For example, the type of automobile, what’s farther ahead, the road, the weather, how they accelerate, decelerate, change lanes and react to others are all taken into consideration.)

Unnecessarily large gaps are often a sign of an inexperienced driver. In traffic, they can easily initiate congestion and accidents.
Unnecessarily large gaps are often a sign of an inexperienced driver. In traffic, they can easily initiate congestion and accidents.

Driving Tip #23

If a person unnecessarily creates chain reactions or unnecessarily turns a slow-and-go into stop-and-go traffic or initiates an accident because of wanting the large gap, then it’s not very safe or efficient, is it?

Important Note: I feel compelled to reiterate that ‘looking ahead and reading the situation and others (and their gap and surroundings) properly’ is paramount in order to successfully tell if a gap is unnecessarily large.

An extra large gap can easily increase traffic congestion and lead to accidents and fatalities.
An extra large gap can easily increase traffic congestion and lead to accidents and fatalities.

Driving Tip #22

If someone changes lanes into a large gap, does the person following slow down to get the same gap back? If so, that tells you what their comfort zone is. Or, do they use the gap to efficiently absorb some of the slowing. Or, do they change lanes timely without causing slowing for anyone. What they do and how they do it will indicate their handling and timing skills.

Important note: Again, ‘reading’ and taking their surroundings into consideration is necessary in order to read their gap and actions properly.

‘How’ a person uses their gap tells you more about them than ‘what size’ a gap they have.
‘How’ a person uses their gap tells you more about them than ‘what size’ a gap they have.

Driving Tip #21

When you know what to look for, a person’s gap can tell you about their comfort zone, their confidence, their awareness and their handling, timing and reaction skills. And once you start learning this about an individual, it becomes easier to predict their actions and reactions and thus better perform yours.

Important note: ’Reading’ and taking their surroundings into consideration is necessary in order to read them and their gap properly.

Properly ‘reading’ people by ‘reading’ their gap (and their surroundings) is how more traffic congestion and accidents can be prevented.
Properly ‘reading’ people by ‘reading’ their gap (and their surroundings) is how more traffic congestion and accidents can be prevented.

Driving Tip #20

Do you actively look for gaps and how they are being utilized? Many people simply look for one or two vehicles. And those who do look at gaps misinterpret/mis-read what those gaps mean.

Actively looking at gaps and how they are being used is valuable information to help prevent traffic congestion and accidents.
Actively looking at gaps and how they are being used is valuable information to help prevent traffic congestion and accidents.

Driving Tip #19

Another obscure tip. This one is especially helpful in slower moving traffic when watching for movement, such as stop-and-go rush hour at night and at intersections. Another favorite is watching reflections off of store windows when preparing to back out.

They can all aid you in noticing others and their actions so that you can better time yours.

Using reflections off of vehicles, windows and other shiny objects to better ‘read traffic’ to help traffic flow and increases safety.
Using reflections off of vehicles, windows and other shiny objects to better ‘read traffic’ to help traffic flow and increases safety.

Driving Tip #18

Even when you can’t see the vehicles in front of the vehicle ahead of you, there are still indications of where they are and when they are braking. …And even though this tip may seem insignificant, it can valuable information and make the difference when it comes time to #preventaccidents.

Using reflections off of the pavement to help traffic flow and to help prevent accidents.
Using reflections off of the pavement to help traffic flow and to help prevent accidents.

 

Driving Tip #17

You can tell a lot about a person’s skills by how they utilize hills. Do they unnecessarily step on the brakes when going downhill? If so, when do they let off? …Or, do they accelerate or use gravity and their momentum when going downhill in order to help propel them up the other side?

(Of course, getting an accurate ‘reading’ of their skills requires taking their full surroundings into consideration, which requires more ‘reading traffic’ from you.)

You can increase efficiency and driver safety by ‘reading’ how others utilize hills.
You can increase efficiency and driver safety by ‘reading’ how others utilize hills.

Driving Tip #16

Being able to see multiple vehicles (and thus multiple gaps) in multiple lanes is valuable information, indeed. It gives a person the opportunity to better time their accelerations, decelerations and lane changes.

Using hills to read the road gives you valuable information to help prevent accidents and achieve smoother traffic flow.
Using hills to read the road gives you valuable information to help prevent accidents and achieve smoother traffic flow.

Driving Tip #15

Seeing around large trucks is a perfect example.

Where once you could see a few automobiles and their gaps*, now you can see many automobiles, each gap, the people, their body language, their level of attention, their actions and reactions, lane positioning, lane changes, accelerations, decelerations, etc… Each piece of knowledge is valuable information about that person’s skills, which you can use to better anticipate the accelerations and decelerations in front of you and thus be more efficient with yours.

*Understanding ‘gap technology’ is very important in order to maximize the benefits of this tip. It’s probably not what you think. We’ll come ‘gap technology’ soon.

Using the curve in the road to help you prevent accidents and achieve smoother flowing traffic by better timing your accelerations and deceleration.
Using the curve in the road to help you prevent accidents and achieve smoother flowing traffic by better timing your accelerations and deceleration.

Driving Tip #14

Not only is it beneficial because you get to see many automobiles and what they are doing but you also get to see the gaps in-between each (gap technology) and how they are being used. (We’ll cover ‘gap technology’ soon.)

Looking around the passenger side of the person in front of you isn’t always easy. Many times it is necessary to move over to the far side of the lane.

Looking around the drive-side and passenger-side helps reduce traffic congestion and prevent accidents.
Looking around the drive-side and passenger-side helps reduce traffic congestion and prevent accidents.

Driving Tip #13

Now, instead of just observing the one person in front, by looking through their windshield to see what the person in front of them is doing, you now have knowledge to make a more educated choice on whether deceleration is necessary, and if so, how much.

Increase efficiency, reduce traffic congestion and accidents by better timing accelerations and deceleration by looking through the windshield of the vehicle ahead.
Increase efficiency, reduce traffic congestion and accidents by better timing accelerations and deceleration by looking through the windshield of the vehicle ahead.

Driving Tip #11

Being able to eliminate a portion of deceleration rather than compounding it IS how to eliminate most traffic congestion. It can also be the difference in wether an accident occurs or not. But as the tip says, taking everything into consideration is key. Your surroundings, what’s farther ahead, your gap distance, the skills of the person braking and why they are braking, to name a few.

Eliminate and prevent traffic congestion by not automatically stepping on brakes and compounding the problem.
Eliminate and prevent traffic congestion by not automatically stepping on brakes and compounding the problem.

Driving Tip #10

Consciously mastering our own accelerations and deceleration is how to maximize efficiency and safety. It requires honest analysis, reading traffic, timing and testing.

How often do you consciously work on the timing of your accelerations and decelerations?

To reduce traffic congestion and accidents and to increase efficiency, learn to master every acceleration and deceleration.
Each of our own accelerations and decelerations are an opportunity to become better.

Driving Tip #9

Do you actively learn about why someone uses their brakes? Is it because they are maintaining a specific gap or reacting to someone else or because they are trying to maintain a specific speed? Knowing ‘why’ can be powerful information to help increase your efficiency, prevent traffic congestion and even an accident.

Observing brake lights and ‘why’ they are used, is a valuable skill set.
Observing brake lights and ‘why’ they are used, is a valuable skill set.

Driving Tip #7

Many experts use their peripheral vision and look in their mirrors a dozen times a minute. Sometimes a lot more. And they do this without taking focus off of what’s ahead of them.

The goal is to build your ‘reading traffic’ skills to a level where you can safely look in your mirrors without it distracting you from what’s ahead.

Looking over your shoulder is also a viable way to see what’s going on behind you, but as you continue to increase skills with mirrors, you’ll notice that you get more information in a quicker amount of time with less effort, less distraction and less deceleration by using your mirrors properly on a regular basis.

Setting and using mirrors accurately, has and will continue to prevent thousands of accidents, save thousands of lives and increase the fuel efficiency for millions of people!
Setting and using mirrors accurately, has and will continue to prevent thousands of accidents, save thousands of lives and increase the fuel efficiency for millions of people!

Driving Tip #6

There is no ‘one way’ to set mirrors. What you want to know is where your mirrors are aiming for you. Personally, I like to see just a sliver of the side of my automobile in my side mirrors.

The key is to not have to move your head or adjust your body in order to see in any of your mirrors. …To be able to see in each by just moving your eyes so that even when you aren’t consciously looking, your subconscious is still taking in what is going on behind you and next to you. And when consciously looking, you can update and validate information with a glance.

Properly adjusted mirrors helps prevent blind spot accidents, makes for easier lane changes and reduces surprises.
Properly adjusted mirrors helps prevent blind spot accidents, makes for easier lane changes and reduces surprises.

Driving Tip #5

The more you are aware of your surroundings, the less hesitation and unnecessary deceleration that usually occur, which means an increase in efficiency for you and others.

How often do you use your mirrors? Is it ‘only’ when you need to or are they something you continually use in order to take in information?
How often do you use your mirrors? Is it ‘only’ when you need to or are they something you continually use in order to take in information?